The Hunt For A Parking Spot Ends Here: ParkMe API

Candice McMillan, February 4th, 2013

ParkMeTrying to find parking in a busy city can be unnecessarily time consuming and downright frustrating. Imagine you had someone sending you real-time notifications indicating available parkings in a given area; brilliant. ParkMe makes this a reality. The Santa Monica based service provides parking information to navigation companies and smartphones. ParkMe also provides the ParkMe API that enables developers to integrate this functionality with other applications.

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The ParkMe app uses heat maps to help users find available parkings in real-time. This shows users the most likely parking availability on a block by block basis. The service also includes a rate calculator, in-app route guidance and a timer. ParkMe’s extensive parking database includes over 25 000 worldwide locations in more than 500 cities, 19 countries and three continents, making it a relevant and pretty helpful tool.

Developers will need an API key to access the ParkMe API, and they can request this by emailing parking@parkme.com. Public documentation is not available.

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One Response to “The Hunt For A Parking Spot Ends Here: ParkMe API”

February 8th, 2013
at 10:01 am
Comment by: API Spotlight: O*net, Refill, and the ParkMe API

[...] Of the many APIs we published this week, ten were highlighted on the blog by our team of writers. In this post, we’ll shine a spotlight on those ten, which included the ParkMe API. ParkMe utilizes heat mapping to help users find empty parking spots in busy cities. For cold/blue heat signatures mean less activity where as red/hot means more activity. Depending on the area, these colors could mean open or taken spots. The ParkMe API simply allows developers to integrate the ParkMe functionality with their applications. To learn more about the ParkMe API visit the ParkMe site as well as the ParkMe API blog post. [...]

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