COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

Guest Author, October 13th, 2009

This guest post comes from Daniel Jacobson, Director of Application Development for NPR. Daniel leads NPR’s content management solutions, is the creator of the NPR API and is a frequent contributor to the Inside NPR.org blog.

NPRThe digital media world is in the process of dramatic change. For years, the Internet has been about web sites and browser-based experiences, and the systems that drove those sites generally matched those experiences. But now, the portable world is upon us and it is formidable. With the growing need and ability to be portable comes tremendous opportunity for content providers. But it also requires substantial changes to their thinking and their systems. It requires distribution platforms, API’s and other ways to get the content to where it needs to be. But having an API is not enough. In order for content providers to take full advantage of these new platforms, they will need to, first and foremost, embrace one simple philosophy: COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere).

npr_architecture_diagram_490

The diagram above represents NPR’s content management pipeline and how it embraces these COPE principles. The basic principle is to have content producers and ingestion scripts funnel content into a single system (or series of closely tied systems). Once there, the distribution of all content can be handled identically, regardless of content type or its destinations (Click here for an enlargement of this diagram).

COPE

Through COPE, our systems have enabled incredible growth despite having a small staff and limited resources. Although the CMS is home-grown, COPE itself is agnostic as to the build or buy/integrate decision. Any system that adheres to these principles, whether it is a COTS product, home-grown, or anything in between, will see the benefits of content modularity and portability.

In this series of posts, I will be discussing these philosophies, as well as how NPR applied them and how we were able to do so much with so little (including our NPR API).

COPE is really a combination of several other closely related sub-philosophies, including:

  • Build content management systems (CMS), not web publishing tools (WPT)
  • Separate content from display
  • Ensure content modularity
  • Ensure content portability

These philosophies have a direct impact on API and distribution strategies as well. Creating an API on top of a COPE-less system will distribute the content, but there is still no guarantee that the content can actually live on any platform. COPE is dependent on these other philosophies to ensure that the content is truly portable.

Build CMS, not WPT

COPE is the key difference between content management systems and web publishing tools, although these terms are often used interchangeably in our industry. The goal of any CMS should be to gather enough information to present the content on any platform, in any presentation, at any time. WPT’s capture content with the primary purpose of publishing web pages. As a result, they tend to manage the content in ways focused on delivering it to the web. Plug-ins are often available for distribution to other platforms, but applying tools on top of the native functions to manipulate the content for alternate destinations makes the system inherently unscalable. That is, for each new platform, WPT’s will need a new plug-in to tailor the presentation markup to that platform. CMS’s, on the other hand, store the content cleanly, enabling the presentation layers to worry about how to display the content not on how to transform the markup embedded within it.

True CMS’s are really just content capturing tools that are completely agnostic as to how or where the content will be viewed, whether it is a web page, mobile app, TV or radio display, etc. Additionally, platforms that don’t yet exist are able to be served by a true CMS in ways that WPT’s may not be able to (even with plug-ins). By applying COPE, NPR was able to quickly jump on advancements throughout the years like RSS, Podcasts, API’s and mobile platforms with relative ease. As an example, the public API took only about two developer months to create, and most of that time was spent on user and rights management.

This presentation shows the same NPR story displayed in a wide range of platforms. The content, through the principles of COPE, is pushed out to all of these destinations through the NPR API. Each destination, meanwhile, uses the appropriate content for that presentation layer.

Separate Content from Display

Separating content from display is one of the key concepts supporting COPE. In the most basic form, this means that the presentation layer needs to be a series of templates that know how to pull in the content from the repository. This enables the presentation layer to care about how the content will look while the content can be display-agnostic, allowing it to appear on a web site, a mobile device, etc.

But to truly separate content from display, the content repository needs to also avoid storing “dirty” content. Dirty content is content that contains any presentation layer information embedded in it, including HTML, XML, character encodings, microformats, and any other markup or rich formatting information. This separation is achieved by the two other principles, content modularity and content portability

At a high level, many systems and organizations are applying the basics of COPE. They are able to distribute content to different platforms, separate content from display, etc. But to take some of these systems to the next level, enabling them to scale and adapt to our changing landscape, they will need to focus more on content modularity and portability. In my next post, I will go into more detail about NPR’s approach to content modularity and why our approach is more than just data normalization.

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78 Responses to “COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere”

October 13th, 2009
at 9:24 am
Comment by: Todd

Whoa! Awesome.

Any plans to release this as open source?

October 13th, 2009
at 2:00 pm
Comment by: Daniel Jacobson

@Todd: We have talked a lot about opening up our CMS to the community and it is in our long-term strategy. That said, converting our system into a truly portable product is a big undertaking. Despite the magnitude of the project, it is still something that we very much want to do and will be making strides towards over time.

October 13th, 2009
at 9:19 pm
Comment by: Bookmarks for October 13th < fugaz

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere – Post a comment | Trackback URI [...]

October 14th, 2009
at 11:08 am
Comment by: NPR’s COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere « Predicate, LLC | Editorial + Content Strategy

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere, by Daniel Jacobson of NPR. See his related post. [...]

October 14th, 2009
at 10:23 pm
Comment by: CMS or COPE? « Small Business+Phoenix+Software

[...] or COPE? A nice article and diagram on NPR’s Content Management System built on the principles of Create Once, Publish [...]

October 14th, 2009
at 11:54 pm
Comment by: iterativelearning » Blog Archive » COPE

[...] interesting post in the Programmable Web by Daniel Jacobson on Create Once, Publish Everywhere (COPE). Two big standouts for me are how it foregrounds portability (e.g., to mobile platforms) and [...]

October 20th, 2009
at 1:30 am
Comment by: At NPR’s unconference, 2009 is the year of “We, the media.” « digiphile

[...] Jacobson wrote more about the NPR API at the Programmable [...]

October 21st, 2009
at 12:25 pm
Comment by: Content Modularity: More Than Just Data Normalization

[...] discussed in my previous post, COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) is a fundamental philosophy that drives NPR’s digital [...]

October 25th, 2009
at 11:04 am
Comment by: C3? | C3 - Complete Community Connection

[...] Public Radio is well down this path.  Their Create Once, Publish Anywhere system is a joy to use.  Try their iphone/itouch [...]

October 25th, 2009
at 1:02 pm
Comment by: Οικοσύστημα παρακολούθησης προμηθειών και διαγωνισμών « Λίγο από όλα

[...] για δημιουργία-μια φορά-δημοσιοποίηση-παντού, βλ. COPE [...]

October 28th, 2009
at 9:14 am
Comment by: Follow live digital coverage of APME convention this week « Pursuing the Complete Community Connection

[...] and execution in which we produce content independently of products, as NPR is doing in its Create Once, Publish Everywhere [...]

November 5th, 2009
at 5:04 pm
Comment by: Andrew Golis » Blog Archive » links for 2009-11-05

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere This is so intense and impressive. (tags: npr syndication api mobile blogging) [...]

November 6th, 2009
at 3:38 am
Comment by: Hello World » Blog Archive » Weekly Digest

[...] Shared COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere. [...]

November 11th, 2009
at 2:17 pm
Comment by: Content Portability: Building an API is Not Enough

[...] previous posts focused on COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) and content modularity, the fundamentals for ensuring that content can be managed and distributed [...]

November 12th, 2009
at 4:47 pm
Comment by: Unbundling the Magazine « Ergo McHenceforth

[...] these concepts nicely in his recently coined acronym COPE, standing for their philosophy of “Create Once, Publish Everywhere,” and illustrates it by way of a diagram of their content management [...]

November 12th, 2009
at 6:09 pm
Comment by: The NPR Model Is Correct | Tech Startups

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere Content Modularity: More Than Just Data Normalization Content Portability: Building an API is Not Enough [...]

November 13th, 2009
at 5:17 pm
Comment by: Things I Found Interesting Around November 12th | Chris Coyier

[...] COPECreate Once, Publish Everywhere [...]

November 24th, 2009
at 6:28 am
Comment by: NPR – doing everything right - blog - James Cridland

[...] other people. They regularly contribute to the web as a whole – witness this article about their content management system, for example – or their discussion of their site redesign process. “Agree on [...]

December 4th, 2009
at 9:20 am
Comment by: Sorry, it’s too late to COPE « CMSish

[...] it’s too late to COPE I was just reading an interesting couple of posts by Daniel Jacobson on the content storage strategy they’ve adopted for the U.S National [...]

December 17th, 2009
at 2:35 pm
Comment by: Peter Monks » Blog Archive » The Case for Killing “WCM”

[...] Production System” (CPS) and “Presentation Management System” (PMS), and in their COPE strategy NPR uses the terms “Content Management System” (CMS) and “Web Publishing [...]

February 17th, 2010
at 8:12 am
Comment by: The Sanctity of Publication « Safe Digression

[...] I can choose to just publish my thoughts 140 characters at a time. I live in a world where I can COPE (create once, publish [...]

March 20th, 2010
at 11:29 pm
Comment by: Daniel Jacobson's Blog » COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

[...] This post first appeared on ProgrammableWeb.com. [...]

April 20th, 2010
at 8:50 am
Comment by: » How will ESC COPE? Damon Cook

[...] back to COPE.  NPR (National Public Radio) created a nice information and infrastructure abstraction of how they Cr… ESC certainly has a few more layers to piece together, but hopefully there will be great strides in [...]

April 22nd, 2010
at 12:02 pm
Comment by: We’re in the information business

[...] Narrative is a crucial part of good journalism, but it’s not enough, not anymore. The news industry needs to start thinking about journalism in terms of information and the myriad ways in which we can present that information to our readers. Daniel Jacobson, director of application development over at NPR, sums it up as follows: build a content management system, not a web publishing tool. The goal of any CMS should be to gather enough information to present the content on any platform, in any presentation, at any time. WPT’s capture content with the primary purpose of publishing web pages. (Daniel Jacobson) [...]

July 24th, 2010
at 2:03 pm
Comment by: Richard Sheffield

We see this content strategy problem all the time in managing our Web content for a Fortune 50 site. We confuse CMS with WTP and use our CMS to generate our very complex site navigation as well as content. The complex navigation files (that also include dynamic functionality by country and language) get consumed by another layer that controls the content display. I’ll do some digging and see if COPE can help in this area. We certainly need another layer of abstraction somewhere!

August 10th, 2010
at 12:36 am
Comment by: The Thin Pink Line Blog: women and work, women and leadership, women and careers, women and negotiation, women and money, work/life balance » Simple Tips for Mastering Social Media, Part II

[...] 6. COPE – Create Once, Publish Everywhere. Another best practice in sharing content is to get the most out of everything you create. If you write a blog post, get interviewed on a podcast or create any other content, share it on appropriate social media sites. Similarly, if you work for an organization that produces content (such as white papers, cool ads or events), share that information with your networks to support the brand of your company. Learn more about the COPE concept here. [...]

September 26th, 2010
at 3:24 pm
Comment by: Sabrina Gibson

I agree that the name of the game is massive content massively distributed. The COPE concept seems interesting. Would love to find out how easily this is implemented and how practical this is for the layman.

October 26th, 2010
at 4:18 pm
Comment by: NPR’s COPE is teh awesome | DigitalMedia-Source.com

[...] blog.programmableweb.com/2009/10/13/cope-&#1089r&#1077&#1072t&#1077-once-publ… [...]

December 15th, 2010
at 1:06 pm
Comment by: Looking for a co-conspirator

[...] don’t really manage anything. They publish [...]

March 9th, 2011
at 6:30 pm
Comment by: Daniel Jacobson on de-coupled publishing systems | Content Here

[...] NPR’s Director of Application Development, has an excellent article on the philosophy of de-coupling the content management tier from the delivery tier. He calls this strategy COPE: Create Once Publish Everywhere. In particular, the diagram is [...]

April 17th, 2011
at 3:04 pm
Comment by: Create Once Publish Everywhere: A Future-Proof Mobile Architecture | Mutual Mobile

[...] The solution calls for product teams to adopt a mantra of Create Once Publish Everywhere (COPE as originally coined by Daniel Jacobson). To accommodate mobile, software architects for modern companies have a responsibility to ensure [...]

April 18th, 2011
at 9:32 am
Comment by: What We Did Wrong: NPR Improves its API Architecture

[...] are a quick path to having flexible content that embraces the idea of COPE that has been discussed here before. Building API’s allows content producers to be much more [...]

April 18th, 2011
at 11:22 am
Comment by: G A Redding

The NPR implementation seems to be based on the COPE-Enabled Media Publishing and Distribution System developed and published in 2000 written Douglas Heise and Johnathan Hornstein of iLX, Inc’s Digital Media and Broadband Solutions Group and sponsored by Cisco, Digital Island, EMC2 Oracle, and Sun.

July 5th, 2011
at 10:42 am
Comment by: NPR’s COPE is teh awesome | GraphicInsider.Com

[...] blog.programmableweb.com/2009/10/13/cope-create-once-publ… [...]

August 1st, 2011
at 10:31 am
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November 16th, 2011
at 11:38 am
Comment by: Tuesday Newsday: Audio News Apps – - Martha Rotter's BlogMartha Rotter's Blog

[...] has done a fant­astic thing by cre­at­ing their COPE (Cre­ate Once, Pub­lish Every­where) sys­tem which allows other people to build on top of them and access their con­tent. This means that there [...]

November 25th, 2011
at 10:20 pm
Comment by: There Is No Spoon » Blog Archive » Three Qs on the future of online media

[...] build systems out of media content. For NPR, this means following Daniel Jacobson’s idea of COPE (Create Once Publish Everywhere). This strategy was responsible for our team investing heavily in [...]

December 14th, 2011
at 5:56 am
Comment by: Mobile content strategy link-o-rama 2011 « Karen McGrane

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere Daniel Jacobson of NPR (now at Netflix) describes NPR’s approach to content management and API development, which aims to separate content from display to ensure content modularity and portability. NPR credits its API with increasing page views by 80%, largely because they’re able to get their content onto a variety of mobile devices without custom programming. See also: Notes from NPR’s 2011 SxSW Session, by Scot Hacker [...]

January 12th, 2012
at 10:04 pm
Comment by: Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone | t3knoDorKs

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere — NPR’s Director of Application Development, Daniel Jacobson, walks by how NPR separates calm from arrangement and uses a singular information source for all a apps, sites, APIs and feeds. A good instance of what Frost talks about per calm as a liquid thing. [...]

January 18th, 2012
at 2:47 am
Comment by: Definite Digest » Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere — NPR’s Director of Application Development, Daniel Jacobson, walks through how NPR separates content from display and uses a single data source for all its apps, sites, APIs and feeds. A great example of what Frost talks about regarding content as a fluid thing. [...]

February 6th, 2012
at 1:18 pm
Comment by: The goal of any CMS should be to gather enough information to present the content on any platform, in any presentation, at any time. | lloyd shepherd dot com

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere Share this:EmailRedditDiggStumbleUpon ← The Happiness Project Trendsmap – Real-time local Twitter trends → [...]

February 29th, 2012
at 2:52 am
Comment by: NPR’s COPE is teh awesome | World Digitals

[...] blog.programmableweb.com/2009/10/13/cope-create-once-publ… Tweet Share Unknown source [...]

February 29th, 2012
at 6:41 am
Comment by: Content Strategy Resources

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere [...]

March 4th, 2012
at 10:59 am
Comment by: Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone

[...] the web has always been responsive, but was temporarily sidetracked by the fad of fixed-width sites.COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere — NPR’s Director of Application Development, Daniel Jacobson, walks through how NPR separates [...]

March 9th, 2012
at 3:43 pm
Comment by: Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone | Witty City Blog

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere — NPR’s Director of Application Development, Daniel Jacobson, walks through how NPR separates content from display and uses a single data source for all its apps, sites, APIs and feeds. A great example of what Frost talks about regarding content as a fluid thing. [...]

March 11th, 2012
at 2:15 am
Comment by: Future-Ready Content | msitechservices

[...] to future-ready its CMS is National Public Radio. Back in 2009, NPR launched a methodology it calls Create Once, Publish Everywhere. With COPE, each story is entered into a set of discrete fields within the CMS, then made available [...]

March 16th, 2012
at 6:56 pm
Comment by: NPR does it right | Scott Rarden

[...] have found one point where their viewpoint and mine match perfectly. I’ve been reading about their Content Management System which uses the COPE philosophy – Create Once, Publish [...]

March 22nd, 2012
at 8:15 am
Comment by: Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone | Paramark Inc.

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere — NPR’s Director of Application Development, Daniel Jacobson, walks through how NPR separates content from display and uses a single data source for all its apps, sites, APIs and feeds. A great example of what Frost talks about regarding content as a fluid thing. [...]

March 22nd, 2012
at 12:45 pm
Comment by: I’m not asking you to converse (yet) – just take a baby step toward social media use! « Magical Public Relations

[...] take me so much time,” you whine. Not so fast. NPR’s Daniel Jacobson sums it all up in COPE (create once, publish everywhere). Programs like Hootsuite can combine all your social media in one [...]

March 22nd, 2012
at 3:17 pm
Comment by: COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere | Small & Simple Things

[...] discusses how they are able to create content once and publish it everywhere (COPE – Create Once, Publish Everywhere). This is a powerful concept for web [...]

March 26th, 2012
at 10:48 pm
Comment by: Mark Steven

There are a number of platform agnostic CMS around already. Content Control is a good example. http://www.contentcontrol.com

April 4th, 2012
at 7:46 am
Comment by: Crossing Channels at IA Summit 2012 | Aquilent Blog

[...] more about COPE in NPR Director of Application Development Daniel Jacobson’s excellent post on programmableweb.com and see examples of COPE in action on [...]

April 11th, 2012
at 8:49 am
Comment by: Веб с прицелом на будущее

[...] COPE (Create Once Publish Everywhere) от NPR стала олицетворением систем управления контентом следующего поколения, потому что она разделяет контент от представления, в результате чего он может чувствовать себя как дома в самых разных окружениях – хоть в вебе, хоть в нативном приложении, на любом экране. Хотя авторы по-прежнему могут писать разметку, система сохраняет контент в Не привязанном к определенному языку формате. Избегая сохранения «грязного» контента (с разметкой и оформительными стилями) и разделяя все на модули, система делает контент более переносимым и дает ему возможность быть представленным по-разному в зависимости от среды. NPR не нужно будет пересматривать всю свою систему даже когда появится огромное количество новых устройств. [...]

April 16th, 2012
at 11:51 am
Comment by: Up With Markdown - Justin Allen

[...] powerful aspect of markdown is the role it can play in a bigger content workflow—the COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) paradigm described by NPR’s Daniel [...]

April 20th, 2012
at 6:06 am
Comment by: Adapt or Die, and The Fold is DEAD.

[...] Event Apart in Seattle, discussed NPR’s approach to content publication, called COPE: “Create Once, Publish Everywhere.” This mindset has allowed NPR to have one of the most successful (and efficient) publication [...]

May 5th, 2012
at 4:32 pm
Comment by: What I’m Reading, May 5, 2012 - Mike Levin

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere [...]

May 25th, 2012
at 8:16 am
Comment by: Student media need to pursue a digital-first approach « The Buttry Diary

[...] systems where content is created once and published to multiple platforms. I recommend studying the Create Once Publish Everywhere approach of NPR and the self-developed content management system (using Google docs and WordPress) [...]

May 25th, 2012
at 11:12 am
Comment by: Adaptive Content: Designing for the Unknown • Nate Archer.ca | Nate Archer.ca

[...] as “create once, publish everywhere”, a mantra that they turned into their system name: COPE. The intent of the system is to streamline the workflow to make sure that each piece of content is [...]

June 6th, 2012
at 4:07 pm
Comment by: Moasy LAB | Contenuti pronti per il futuro

[...] per il futuro è la National Public Radio. Nel 2009, la NPR lanciò una metodologia chiamata COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere [Crea una volta, Pubblica ovunque, ndt], usando la quale ogni storia viene inserita in un insieme [...]

June 11th, 2012
at 11:58 am
Comment by: Future-Ready Content | FOM - Free Online Magazines

[...] to future-ready its CMS is National Public Radio. Back in 2009, NPR launched a methodology it callsCreate Once, Publish Everywhere. With COPE, each story is entered into a set of discrete fields within the CMS, then made available [...]

June 18th, 2012
at 5:31 am
Comment by: Modular And Flexible Content In Responsive Design | Van SEO Design

[...] — is using a method they call COPE (Create once, publish everywhere), that allows content to be more flexible in how it’s combined and presented. It’s a [...]

September 20th, 2012
at 5:28 pm
Comment by: I’m reading New Forms, Old Places | william j. moner

[...] We’re rethinking the CMS and taking more adaptable approaches. We’re even getting serious about flexible content that can be viewed, saved, and shared by people with an ever-widening array of devices and [...]

September 24th, 2012
at 4:49 am
Comment by: קצת על Responsive Design, Mobile First ומה זה COPE לעזעזל? | Rtech – e-Solutions architecture | אר-טק

[...] ומכשירים שונים. אותו הבדל, הוא העומד מאחורי הקונספט של COPE – ראשי תיבות של "Create Once – Publish Everywhere" (עוד [...]

September 26th, 2012
at 8:48 am
Comment by: » Our Content Management Systems are the Mainframes of the Mobile Era Cloud Four Blog

[...] Daniel Jacobsen described NPR’s Create Once Publish Everywhere (COPE) system, he talked about how most content management systems conflate the task of content management with [...]

September 26th, 2012
at 12:03 pm
Comment by: For a Future-Friendly Web on A List Apart | Brad Frost Web

[...] COPE: Create Once Publish Everywhere [...]

September 28th, 2012
at 11:58 am
Comment by: Adapting Ourselves to Adaptive Content (video, slides, and transcript, oh my!) « Karen McGrane

[...] This is NPR’s approach to getting their content out onto a variety of different devices and platforms. They call it COPE – Create Once and Publish Everywhere. So what this means is that they have set up an API that allows them to take content from a variety of different providers. They can take content from content providers; text from a variety of different sources, from all their member stations. They can take music content from a variety of different providers. And what they do is they run that through an API, which allows them to have access to clean, well-structured content that then can be queried by these individual platforms. So what it lets them do is they can get their content out onto a wide variety of different devices and platforms very easily. [...]

October 9th, 2012
at 8:12 am
Comment by: BDConf: Brian Fling presents Resonance: A Mobile Design Ethos | Brad Frost Web

[...] an experience that’s offered across a multitude of channels and devices. Brian used NPR’s COPE strategy as an [...]

October 9th, 2012
at 3:44 pm
Comment by: Is LinkedIn going to revolutionize law firm publishing? | | Molly PorterMolly Porter

[...] that I know we are, we will include LinkedIn among the channels that we must COPE with – Create Once, Publish Everywhere – so that our lawyers and our brands both can benefit from the efforts involved in creating [...]

October 15th, 2012
at 5:00 pm
Comment by: Where to Start with Your Content Marketing Strategy | Accounting and Small Business /Beverly Shares

[...] you can capitalise on? Make sure you understand the channels your audience prefer, and use the COPE principle: create once, publish [...]

October 25th, 2012
at 12:56 am
Comment by: Mensch & Computer und Usability Professionals 2012 – vier Tage im Paradies* | digiparden GmbH aus Schwäbisch Gmünd Der Blog aus dem digiparden Gehege

[...] werden (Open Content) lässt sich schwer sagen. Manche sicherlich. Der Ansatz von npr “Create Once, Publish Everywhere” ist gut und richtig. Ich denke, dass nur die, die sich der Dynamik des Webs öffnen und [...]

November 12th, 2012
at 7:15 am
Comment by: Does Mobile Search Matter In A Multiscreen World?

[...] content strategy of Create Once Publish Everywhere (COPE) has become a model of efficiency for many in the mobile, content, design, and SEO [...]

November 12th, 2012
at 10:40 am
Comment by: Does Cellular Seek Question In the Multiscreen Community? | SEO 2.0

[...] subject material technique of Produce Once Upload Almost just about all over the place (Handle)   has developed into model of proficiency for many people in the cell, subject matter, style, as [...]

November 14th, 2012
at 6:49 pm
Comment by: A round-up of responsive design resources by Andrew Turnbull

[...] for a web that works for all devices. Experiences should be portable across channels. COPE – a design philosophy for responsive content management systems. Create Once, Publish [...]

November 18th, 2012
at 12:56 am
Comment by: SEL- Does Mobile Search Matter In A Multiscreen World? (uh, yes) - Digital Media Strategy Magazine

[...] content strategy of Create Once Publish Everywhere (COPE) has become a model of efficiency for many in the mobile, content, design, and SEO [...]

November 18th, 2012
at 5:12 am
Comment by: Content Strategy is the Missing Piece | CMS Radar

[...] the evolving field of Content Strategy has produced a concepts, tools, and methodologies which have begun to shift people’s opinions on the importance of [...]

November 24th, 2012
at 8:00 am
Comment by: Karen McGrane on Adaptive Content « Liquid Change

[...] mentions the Create Once, Publish Everywhere philosophy at NPR. For more on that: COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere article on programmable web. And OH LOOK OVER THERE: http://www.npr.org/api/index.php Oh, man. [...]

December 19th, 2012
at 1:48 pm
Comment by: COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere « ReadyReactive

[...] COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. Tags COPE, NPR Categories Content Strategy, Structured Content [...]

December 20th, 2012
at 1:35 am
Comment by: COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere | Content Crossroads

[...] http://blog.programmableweb.com/2009/10/13/cope-create-once-publish-everywhere/ [...]

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